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The Nature of Sin in the Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe

November 1, 2011

I cannot think of many better depictions of the nature of sin than the one found in C.S. Lewis’s The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. The essence of sin is so bizarre that it is often best captured in fictional form, although it is very much non-fiction in our lives. Sin is a destructive, penetrating evil that looks appealing at first. In the end, though, it always kills. :

Edmund felt much better as he began to sip the hot drink. It was something he had never tasted before, very sweet and foamy and creamy, and it warmed him right down to his toes.

It is dull, Son of Adam, to drink without eating,” said the Queen presently. “What would you like to eat?”

“Turkish Delight, please your Majesty,” said Edmund.

The Queen let another drop fall from her bottle onto the snow and instantly there appeared a round box, tied with green silk ribbon, which, when opened, turned out to contain several pounds of the best Turkish Delight. Each piece was sweet and light to the very center and Edmund had never tasted anything more delicious. He was quite warm now and very comfortable.

While he was eating the Queen kept asking him questions. At first Edmund tried to remember that it is rude to speak with one’s mouth full, but soon he forgot about this and thought only of trying to shovel down as much Turkish Delight as he could, and the more he ate the more he wanted to eat, and he had never asked himself why the Queen should be so inquisitive. She got him to tell her that he had one brother and two sisters, and that one of his sisters had already been to Narnia and had met a Faun there, and that no one except himself and his brothers and sisters knew anything about Narnia. She seemed especially interested in the fact that there were four of them, and kept coming back to it. “You are sure there are just four of you?” she asked. “Two Sons of Adam and two Daughters of Eve, neither more nor less?” and Edmund, with his mouth full of Turkish Delight, kept on saying, “Yes, I told you that before,” forgetting to call her “Your Majesty,” but she didn’t seem to mind now.

At last the Turkish Delight was all finished and Edmund was looking very hard at the empty box and wishing that she would ask him whether he would like some more. Probably the Queen knew quite well what he was thinking: for she knew, though Edmund did not, that this was enchanted Turkish Delight and that anyone who had once tasted it would want more and more of it, and would even, if they were allowed, go on eating it till they killed themselves. But she did not offer him any more. Instead, she said to him,

“Son of Adam, I would so much like to see your brother and your two sisters. Will you bring them to see me?”

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