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Readings on Baptism and the Lord’s Supper

February 25, 2012

One of the topics I get a lot of questions on as a Children’s Director have to do with the sacraments – Baptism and the Lord’s Supper. Justin Taylor has put together a great list of articles and books on the topic to help us as we understand these means of grace to us and our children. I have read a few of these and I would recommend nearly the whole list:

First, on baptism:

Well, first of all David Kingdon, Children of Abraham: A Reformed Baptist View of Baptism, The Covenant, and Children (Haywards Heath, Sussex: Carey Publications, 1973). It is out of print, but it is the best twentieth-century study of baptism from a Reformed and Baptist perspective.

Paul K. Jewett, Infant Baptism and the Covenant of Grace (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publ. Co., 1978) is a similar study and also well worth reading. . . .

There are older works, by authors like Alexander Carson, that are worthwhile, but these two are the best from the past century.

Then, for historical discussions of early Christian baptism I would recommend two small books: Hendrick F. Stander and Johannes P. Louw,Baptism in the Early Church (Leeds: Reformation Today Trust, 2004) is a gem and F.M. Buhler, Baptism: Three Aspects (Dundas, Ontario: Joshua Press, 2004) is a much-overlooked piece that helpfully deals with the archaeological evidence pertaining to early Christian baptismal practice.

And on the Lord’s Supper:

Keith Mathison, Given for You: Reclaiming Calvin’s Doctrine of the Lord’s Supper (P&R Publishing, 2002): the best study of Calvin’s vital thought on this ordinance.

Anne Dutton, Thoughts on the Lord’s Supper, Relating to the Nature, Subjects, and Right Partaking of This Solemn Ordinance (London: J. Hart, 1748): a classic Baptist reflection.

And two contemporary studies—each small, but both powerful:

Ernest Kevan, The Lord’s Supper (Welwyn, Hertfordshire: Evangelical Press, 1966).

Robert Letham, The Lord’s Supper: Eternal Word in Broken Bread (P&R Publishing, 2001).

 

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